COFFEE AND INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN A MICE MODEL OF NAFLD
Author(s): ,
Giovanna Mazzone
Affiliations:
Clinical Medicine And Surgery,University Federico II,Naples,Italy
,
Vincenzo Lembo
Affiliations:
Clinical Medicine And Surgery,University Federico II,Naples,Italy
,
Giuseppe D'Argenio
Affiliations:
Clinical Medicine And Surgery,University Federico II,Naples,Italy
,
Paola Vitaglione
Affiliations:
Agricultural Sciences,University Federico II,Naples,Italy
,
Antonella Rossi
Affiliations:
Clinical Medicine And Surgery,University Federico II,Naples,Italy
,
Ilenia Piscosquito
Affiliations:
Clinical Medicine And Surgery,University Federico II,Naples,Italy
,
Marcella Savoia
Affiliations:
Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnology,University Federico II,Naples,Italy
,
Maria Guido
Affiliations:
Medicine, Anatomic Pathology Section,University of Padova,Padova,Italy
,
Filomena Morisco
Affiliations:
Clinical Medicine And Surgery,University Federico II,Naples,Italy
Nicola Caporaso
Affiliations:
Clinical Medicine And Surgery,University Federico II,Naples,Italy
EASL LiverTree™. Lembo V. Apr 16, 2016; 126191; SAT-342 Topic: Experimental
Dr. Vincenzo Lembo
Dr. Vincenzo Lembo
Contributions
Abstract
SAT-342

Topic: Experimental

Background and aims
It was previously demonstrated that high fat diet (HFD)-induced liver damage is reversed by coffee consumption through a reduction of fat deposition in the liver and an amelioration of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory status. Since the alteration of gut microbiota and permeability play a role in the plethora of factors underpinning non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the protective effect of coffee on NAFLD was associated to a variation of intestinal tight junction structure in a mice model of NAFLD.

Methods
Three groups of 8 C57BL/6J mice each were studied: one group received standard diet (3.3 kcal/g) (SD), one group received high fat diet (5.6 kcal/g) (HFD), and a third group received HFD plus decaffeinated coffee solution (HFD+ Coffee) for 12 weeks. The decaffeinated coffee powder was diluted in water to afford mice a daily dosage of coffee corresponding to a daily dose of 6 cups of espresso coffee or 2 cups of filtered coffee for a 70 kg person.

Results
Coffee supplementation significantly reversed the HFD–induced increase of serum cholesterol (p<0,001) and ALT (p<0,05) and of liver macrovesicular steatosis (p<0,001) and ballooning degeneration (p<0,05). HFD and HFD+COFFEE mice had higher energy intakes (p=0.0001 and p<0,0001) and gained more body weight than SD mice (p<0.001). Although HFD+COFFEE mice had a caloric intake comparable to HFD ones, starting from the 8th intervention week they gained significantly less weight over time (p=0.028). HFD+COFFEE mice experienced an increased expression of the duodenal and colonic Zonulin (ZO)-1 as well as duodenal claudin compared to HFD mice (p<0.05).

Conclusions
Data confirmed that HFD induced in mice biochemical and histological alterations in liver typical of human NAFLD and demonstrated that coffee supplementation can reverse that status by reducing ALT, macrovesicular steatosis and ballooning degeneration. Interestingly, coffee consumption reduced body weight gain in mice fed HFD and determined changes in the expression of intestinal epithelium ZO-1 and claudin. All in all the data suggested that the protective effect of coffee on NAFLD may be mediated by an amelioration of gut permeability.

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